Trust.

Trust

Trust your 2AM ideas. Trust them enough to get out of bed to write them down. You at least owe them that for their effort.

An idea shook me awake last night, and it continues to nudge at me like…

Get up. This could work. Don’t sleep on this.

She’s persistent, and for good reason.

This idea is about connecting people. Connecting communities. The spirit of connectivity is in the air.

Two weeks ago, faith leaders connected in downtown Portland and sang:

And on Sunday night, at the Muslim Educational Trust (MET) in Tigard, nearly 400 people from various faith communities gathered together to hear an all-woman panel speak about their various faith traditions, their perspectives on justice, and the real and dire need to develop “Beloved Community” with one another. When one of the panelists, a Christian minister, said to the crowd: “If they want to register Muslims, they can register me,”, this happened:

People are moving in unison. There are moments of harmony in the midst of the cultural dissonance. This gives me hope.

(Hope ain’t easy to come by at the moment.)

I’m not ready to spill the idea in full. It’s still early. But I’m beginning to float it to people in my community and around the city. It’s a simple idea, which is part of why I think it will work. It’s also a flexible, malleable idea.

Here’s the gist:

We need interfaith connectivity in small, manageable, but meaningful doses. We need relationships. We need to see ourselves as kin, even as we preserve and honor those aspects of our faith traditions which make us unique and different from one another.

I have an idea that may help us do that, at least on a small scale. It may be scaleable in a bigger way, but I’m going to start small – I’ll start with myself and my community. If it works there, maybe it will work elsewhere. If it doesn’t work there, then I’m sure there will be something for me to learn.

But she had to wake me up for a reason. She knew something I didn’t know, and I’m bound and determined to find out just what that is.